How do I Correct Mistakes on My Credit Report?
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Published on
July 9, 2021
You do that by sending a dispute letter to the credit reporting bureau that provided the incorrect report (like Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion) and preferably to the information provider (like your bank or credit card company) as well.


For reference on what a dispute letter should look like, the Federal Trade Commission has templates for letters to credit reporting bureaus and templates for letters to information providers. As a general rule of thumb, your dispute letter needs to include your complete name and address, a clear outline of which item needs correction, and a solid explanation about why you are disputing the information on your credit report.


Dispute letters can be submitted online via either the Equifax, TransUnion, or Experian web portals or sent by mail. If you choose to mail your dispute, be sure to send through certified mail and request a return receipt so you have documented proof of whether the credit bureau received your letter. And if you need to send documents in order to support your dispute, DO NOT include originals. Send copies instead.


Credit reporting companies typically respond to your dispute within 30–45 days. They are required to give you a free copy of your new credit report (if the changes were accepted) along with the results of their investigation in writing.


Common errors to dispute include:

  • Typo or misprint with your name, address, and/or phone number
  • Credit limit errors
  • Wrong account balance
  • A duplicate account (an account that was mistakenly reported more than once)
  • A former spouse’s debts or lines of credit are still reflected on your credit report
  • Any mysterious account or debt that you did not open
  • A credit file or account that you did open but isn’t showing up on your credit report.

What if my dispute is unresolved or denied?


You can always request to have your statement of dispute included with all future reports. This means that if a lender checks your credit history[link to credit pull post], they will see that you had filed a dispute and do not agree with your current credit report.

Worst case scenario, you’ll want to find a lawyer.


Errors on your credit report can be detrimental to your financial standing. They can limit your loan options and prevent you from qualifying for better terms and rates. So if you notice a mistake on your credit report, know that correcting it is always worth the hassle.

To correct any mistakes on your credit report, you will need to formally dispute it. You do that by sending a dispute letter to the credit reporting bureau that provided the incorrect report (like Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion) and preferably to the information provider (like your bank or credit card company) as well.


For reference on what a dispute letter should look like, the Federal Trade Commission has templates for letters to credit reporting bureaus and templates for letters to information providers. As a general rule of thumb, your dispute letter needs to include your complete name and address, a clear outline of which item needs correction, and a solid explanation about why you are disputing the information on your credit report.

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